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Faculty Information at Spokane Falls Community College: Copyright

Copyright for Educators and Students

Disney Introduces Copyright Basics

Embedded videos are URL linked so embedding is legal since the video will disappear if the person who produced the video removes the film from the web.

 A Fair(y) Use Tale. Note the initial FBI Warning it's different http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7nkQJZhAUw#t=12

Suggested Limits

Suggested limits:

These are limits commonly suggested by schools, universities and colleges when determining what can be used in a multi-media student project or teaching tool posted on a website or distributed to a class. 

Images: Entire images of an artist or photographer can be used with the proviso that up to a 5 image maximum from any given artist or photographer are used. If using a collective work, not more than 10% or 15 images, whichever is less, can be used.

Movies: Up to 10% or three minutes, whichever is less

Text: Up to 10% or 1,000 words, whichever is less. (The limits on poetry are more restrictive.)

Music: Up to 10% of an individual copyrighted musical composition. 10% of a copyrighted musical composition on a sound recording. However, no more than 30 seconds may be used without gaining permission from the copyright owner and/or publisher.

Multimedia projects including copyright materials are time limited to 2 years. 

Websites

Copyright Powerpoint

copyright

More presentations from Jan Wingenroth

Reference Help

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Copyright

Films and DVD: General Guidelines Recognized by many colleges and universities

 

Common Questions:

 

May I purchase or rent a film from the local video store and use it in my class?

DVDs are labeled "Home Use Only", indicating a licensing agreement with the copyright holder. Nevertheless, use of such videos is considered "fair use" in a face-to-face teaching situation. Videos marked "Home Use Only" may also be placed on reserve and viewed in the library.

Can an auditorium or other large space be used to show a video labeled "Home Use Only" to a class?

Yes, so long as the performance is not open to the public and is for an instructional purpose within the structure of the course. Use for entertainment is prohibited.

Can a college-owned DVD be copied for online viewing?

Not unless permission for the copying has been obtained from the copyright owner.

May a club or other group show a DVD obtained from a personal collection or other local source?

No. However, many film/video libraries and distributors offer the required "public performance rights" that are included in a higher rental fee.

Can a DVD be made of a film that is out of print and deteriorating rapidly?

Although the film is out of print, permission of the copyright owner is nonetheless required.

 

Additional text of the Copyright Act and portions of the House Report (94-1476) combine to provide the following, more detailed list of conditions [from Virginia M. Helms, supra]:

  1. They must be shown as part of the instructional program.
  2. They must be shown either in a classroom or other school location devoted to instruction such as a studio, workshop, library, gymnasium, or auditorium if it is used for instruction.
  3. They must be shown either in a face-to-face setting or where students and teacher(s) are in the same building or general area.
  4. They must be shown only to students and educators.
  5. They must be shown using a legitimate (that is, not illegally reproduced) copy with the copyright notice included.

Further, the relationship between the film or video and the course must be explicit. Films or videos, even in a "face-to-face" classroom setting, may not be used for entertainment or recreation, whatever the work's intellectual content.

Use Outside the Classroom

Besides use in classrooms, DVDs and videodiscs that are owned by the college may ordinarily be viewed by students, faculty or staff at workstations or in small-group rooms in the Media Center or Library. These videos may also be viewed at home , so long as no more than a few friends are involved. Larger audiences, such as groups that might assemble in a residence hall living room, require explicit permission from the copyright owner for "public performance" rights. Check with the library or Media Center to see if  "On-campus Public Performance Rights" have been  secured  for videos. No fees for viewing a video are permitted even when public performance rights are obtained.

Copying DVDS/ Off-Air Recording of Broadcasts, Including Satellite TV

Copying videotapes without the copyright owner's permission is illegal. An exception is made for libraries to replace a work that is lost or damaged if another copy cannot be obtained at a fair price [Section 108 of the Copyright Act of 1976].

Licenses may be obtained for copying and off-air recording. Absent a formal agreement, "Guidelines for Off-the-Air Recording of Broadcast Programming for Educational Purposes", an official part of the Copyright Act's legislative history, applies to most off-air recording

1.    Recordings of broadcasts may be kept for no more than 45 calendar days after the recording date, at which time the tapes must be erased.

Certain public broadcasting services (Public Broadcasting Service, Public Television Library, and Agency for Instructional Television) impose similar restrictions but limit use to only the seven-day period following local broadcast.

Please note that technology is needed to limit access to the network and multimedia project and to prevent copying.  (I’m not sure if or what technology CCS has in this regard.) 
 

 

New Uses of Multimedia

Guidelines from the National Commission on New Technology Uses of Copyrighted Works

(CONTU interpreted by the University of Washington: (and many others)

CONTU Guidelines are the result of the Final Report of the National Commission on New Technology Uses of Copyrighted Works. The Guidelines have been adapted by many universities and organizations including the American Library Association.  Be advised that courts are not bound by established standards or guidelines and the Copyright Act contains no such standards. Therefore, we advise that you conduct your own fair use evaluation in accordance with CCS guidelines found on the college intranet. This interpretation of fair use from the University of Washington seems clear and applies generally accepted guidelines.

CONTU Guidelines http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/dcom/olia/confu/confurep.pdf

Using Materials Found on the Internet

Always credit the source

If you are using the information on your personal web page ask permission or simply link to the site

If you receive permission to use the material keep a copy for your records

Multimedia

Multimedia works are created by combining copyrighted elements such as movies, music, sounds, graphics, and text. It is recommended that you use only small portions of other people's works.

Suggested limits:

Images: Entire images of an artist or photographer can be used with the proviso that up to a 5 image maximum from any given artist or photographer are used. If using a collective work, not more than 10% or 15 images, whichever is less, can be used.

Movies: Up to 10% or three minutes, whichever is less

Text: Up to 10% or 1,000 words, whichever is less. (The limits on poetry are more restrictive.)

Music: Up to 10% of an individual copyrighted musical composition. 10% of a copyrighted musical composition on a sound recording. However, no more than 30 seconds may be used without gaining permission from the copyright owner and/or publisher.

Multimedia projects including copyright materials are time limited to 2 years. 

Educator Use 

Multimedia projects are to be used for face-to-face teaching. 

The multimedia projects are to be assigned to students for directed self-study. 

The multimedia projects can be used for remote or real time instruction on a secure network.

These projects can be used for after-class review or directed self-study.

The multimedia project can be used by the educator for Peer Conferences.

The multimedia project can be used by the educator for a Professional Portfolio.

Attribution and Acknowledgment : Completely credit your sources. Attributions for each work used are required. Include typical bibliographic information: author, title, publisher, place and date of publication. Include the 4 copyright elements: include copyright notice, the copyright symbol, © , year of first publication and the name of the copyright holder. Complete attributions for images must appear on screen with the image(s) used unless this would interfere with an exam.

Student Use

Students may perform and display their own educational multimedia projects created under these guidelines for educational uses in the course for which they were created and may use them in their own portfolios as examples of their academic work for later personal uses such as job and graduate school interviews.

 Copying and Distribution Limitations

Only a limited number of copies, including the original, may be made of an educator's educational multimedia project. For all of the uses permitted by Section 3, there may be no more than two use copies only one of which may be placed on reserve as described in Section 3.2.3.

An additional copy may be made for preservation purposes but may only be used or copied to replace a use copy that has been lost, stolen, or damaged.