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SFCC Library Workshops

This guide provides up-to-date information about currently scheduled information literacy workshops.

Presentation

Evaluation Methods

 

Types of Evaluation Methods

CCOW

If you are looking for a great conversation starter and a more holistic way of determining a source's purpose and credibility, see our library guide on the CCOW evaluation method. 

CRAAP

CRAAP is useful as a basic introduction to the process of evaluation. If you are not sure which evaluation method to start with CRAAP is a great starting place. 

SOAPstone

SOAPstone is a useful strategy for analyzing primary sources. This process will help you examine the different dimensions of a text, which can then be used to employ the text as evidence in discussion or writing. 

SMART Check

The SMART Check is particularly helpful when evaluating news stories.  Determine if your news source is SMART before believing what is reported.    

SIFT Test

SIFT is a 4-step method to quickly ascertain the accuracy of social media posts and websites by using fact-checkers' strategies of cross-referencing information.

Need Help: Ask a Librarian using 24/7 Chat

If you are not sure where to start or could use help evaluating a source, feel free to use the 24/7 Librarian Chat, where you can connect with a librarian any time of day.

 

One Habit: Checking Your Emotions

Do you have a strong reaction to the information you see (e.g., joy, pride, anger)? If so, slow down before you share or use that information.  We tend to react quickly and with less thought to things that evoke strong feelings. By pausing, you give your brain time to process your initial response and to analyze the information more critically. 

Creative Commons License CC-BY-NC-SA
This guide was created by Andrea Baer and Dan Kipnis at Rowan University and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC-BY-NC-SA).

Evaluating Online Sources

Quick Tip

Find what others say about a website. In Google search for "[WEBSITE URL] site: -[WEBSITE URL].

Examples:

  • newyorktimes.com site: -newyorktimes.com
  • minimumwage.com site: -minimumwage.com

The results will be from other websites. While some may have some relationship to the original domain, other sites can give insight into what others say about that site. 

Learn more about "web searching a domain" from Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers.

Creative Commons License CC-BY-NC-SA
This guide was created by Andrea Baer and Dan Kipnis at Rowan University and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC-BY-NC-SA).